Grapefruitprincess ReLoaded: Come with me to the "Bonnie & Clyde Ambush Museum" and the actual Death Site!

Friday, November 12, 2021

Come with me to the "Bonnie & Clyde Ambush Museum" and the actual Death Site!


Come with me to the Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Museum, followed by a trip to the actual death spot in Louisiana. The museum was $8 per person. Is it worth it? Eeeeeh it kinda was. It was a fun exhibit, but the overwhelming smell of cat piss, poorly tried to mask up with an outrageous amount of air fresheners made it a bit miserable. I recall a few original items on display, besides that it was just a collection of newspaper clippings, photos, guns, etc. 

One of Clyde's Remington shotguns, pulled from the death car, a Browning semi-automatic rifle similar to the one used by the Barrow gang, a tire that Clyde stole and gave to an old man (who refused to use it but who kept it as a souvenir), Bonnie's red hat, some glass from the death car windshield, and replicas of Bonnie and Clyde's tombstones set in a simulated graveyard were highlights for me, because that's what I was expecting from this museum. A large mural fills one wall, faithfully recreating the moment of the ambush. 

A fake Bonnie and Clyde Death Car -- a 1934 V-8 Ford riddled with bullet holes -- acts as a stand-in for the Museum's former automotive exhibit: the bullet-riddled car from the 1967 Bonnie and Clyde movie. The movie car was here until 2008, when it was moved to the Crime Museum in Washington, DC, and then to Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, in 2016. The new one has two blood soaked dummies in it, though, so that's different. If you like splatter stuff like that.

To add to the confusion, the REAL death car, along with Clyde's death shirt, are displayed in a casino in Nevada. These bloody artifacts are beyond the budget of the Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Museum: the shirt alone was purchased for $75,000. 

Eight miles south of the Ambush Museum, on an isolated stretch of highway, is the small stone monument that marks the death site of Bonnie and Clyde. It was erected in 1972, and over the years it has been covered with graffiti, gouged with axes, and blasted with gunfire to the point where its inscription is barely legible (It has even been yanked out of the ground a few times). 

The many hearts and intertwined initials scrawled on the monument suggest that young couples make pilgrimages here, digging the Bonnie and Clyde outlaw vibe. The romantic vandalism somehow seems appropriate. I'm pretty sure Bonnie and Clyde would have defaced monuments, too. 

It was a fun trip though, especially driving down to the ambush spot where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. So I guess I can recommend it, especially if you are traveling somewhere on the I-20 close to Shreveport. It's just a little detour and might be worth the stop 🤩

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Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a comment. I love reading them all and will try my best to answer all of your questions. If you would like to contact me for a quicker response please feel free to tweet me at (@grfrprincess), message me on Instagram (@anni_s) or email me. ~Anni

Come with me to the "Bonnie & Clyde Ambush Museum" and the actual Death Site!


Come with me to the Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Museum, followed by a trip to the actual death spot in Louisiana. The museum was $8 per person. Is it worth it? Eeeeeh it kinda was. It was a fun exhibit, but the overwhelming smell of cat piss, poorly tried to mask up with an outrageous amount of air fresheners made it a bit miserable. I recall a few original items on display, besides that it was just a collection of newspaper clippings, photos, guns, etc. 

One of Clyde's Remington shotguns, pulled from the death car, a Browning semi-automatic rifle similar to the one used by the Barrow gang, a tire that Clyde stole and gave to an old man (who refused to use it but who kept it as a souvenir), Bonnie's red hat, some glass from the death car windshield, and replicas of Bonnie and Clyde's tombstones set in a simulated graveyard were highlights for me, because that's what I was expecting from this museum. A large mural fills one wall, faithfully recreating the moment of the ambush. 

A fake Bonnie and Clyde Death Car -- a 1934 V-8 Ford riddled with bullet holes -- acts as a stand-in for the Museum's former automotive exhibit: the bullet-riddled car from the 1967 Bonnie and Clyde movie. The movie car was here until 2008, when it was moved to the Crime Museum in Washington, DC, and then to Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, in 2016. The new one has two blood soaked dummies in it, though, so that's different. If you like splatter stuff like that.

To add to the confusion, the REAL death car, along with Clyde's death shirt, are displayed in a casino in Nevada. These bloody artifacts are beyond the budget of the Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Museum: the shirt alone was purchased for $75,000. 

Eight miles south of the Ambush Museum, on an isolated stretch of highway, is the small stone monument that marks the death site of Bonnie and Clyde. It was erected in 1972, and over the years it has been covered with graffiti, gouged with axes, and blasted with gunfire to the point where its inscription is barely legible (It has even been yanked out of the ground a few times). 

The many hearts and intertwined initials scrawled on the monument suggest that young couples make pilgrimages here, digging the Bonnie and Clyde outlaw vibe. The romantic vandalism somehow seems appropriate. I'm pretty sure Bonnie and Clyde would have defaced monuments, too. 

It was a fun trip though, especially driving down to the ambush spot where Bonnie and Clyde were killed. So I guess I can recommend it, especially if you are traveling somewhere on the I-20 close to Shreveport. It's just a little detour and might be worth the stop 🤩

No comments :

Post a Comment

Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a comment. I love reading them all and will try my best to answer all of your questions. If you would like to contact me for a quicker response please feel free to tweet me at (@grfrprincess), message me on Instagram (@anni_s) or email me. ~Anni