Grapefruitprincess ReLoaded: Vacation Recap Part II / The Little Rock Nine

Friday, April 12, 2013

Vacation Recap Part II / The Little Rock Nine




"The courts can't change how white people think about blacks,
t
hey have to change themselves." - Daisy Bates



This was definitely the most interesting and emotional story I've heard about for the first time during my tripo to Arkansas:

The Little Rock Nine


"The Little Rock Nine were a group of African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. The ensuing Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus, and then attended after the intervention of President Eisenhower.
The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, 347 U.S. 483, on May 17, 1954. The decision declared all laws establishing segregated schools to be unconstitutional, and it called for the desegregation of all schools throughout the nation.
 
After the decision, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) attempted to register black students in previously all-white schools in cities throughout the South. In Little Rock, the capital city of Arkansas, the Little Rock School Board agreed to comply with the high court's ruling. Virgil Blossom, the Superintendent of Schools, submitted a plan of gradual integration to the school board on May 24, 1955, which the board unanimously approved.
 
The plan would be implemented during the fall of the 1957 school year, which would begin in September 1957. By 1957, the NAACP had registered nine black students to attend the previously all-white Little Rock Central High, selected on the criteria of excellent grades and attendance.
 
The nicknamed "Little Rock Nine" consisted of:
  • Ernest Green (b. 1941)
  • Elizabeth Eckford (b. 1941)
  • Jefferson Thomas (1942–2010)
  • Terrence Roberts (b. 1941)
  • Carlotta Walls LaNier (b. 1942)
  • Minnijean Brown (b. 1941)
  • Gloria Ray Karlmark (b. 1942)
  • Thelma Mothershed (b. 1940)
  • Melba Pattillo Beals (b. 1941)
 
Ernest Green was the first African American to graduate from Central High School."
(via Wikipedia)

____________________________
 
Now, in 2013, there are still too many people out there, who think this is wrong:
 
 
I love my man. I love our clash of cultures. And I'm looking forward to teach our kids one day, that the only thing that matters, is the heart and soul. Not the way people look on the outside.
And not the color of their skin.

profile

 
Shop Rachael Ray Store

5 comments :

  1. I haven't been there, but it does sound interesting. I'm glad you enjoyed your trip!

    ReplyDelete
  2. wow...thanks for sharing the "Little Rock 9". I must admit to you, that I too had some feelings about interracial marriage/dating...that's just how I grew up, but when my sister "came out" it taught me that love is love...I want everyone to experience love like I do, and everyone deserves it! God bless your relationship and block them haters!

    Great post Anne!
    -Rekita

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Rekita Nicole,
      Thank you so much for you honest comment! :)
      Nice said "Love is love"! More people should live and love that way!
      The "Little Rock 9" story really touched me. I didn't hear anything about them before. I'm happy I got a chance to learn about those courageous young people!
      xoxo
      Anni

      Delete
  3. Thanks for posting this! I'm a bit torn...as a mother of a biracial son I'm not sure what to teach him. Of course the most important thing that matters is the heart and soul but the outside counts too (perhaps not for love purposes but definitely for life purposes).

    Society will always view my son as a black/bi-racial boy/man. He will be judged against a completely different standard than his white counterparts -- it's just the way it goes. So as much as I want to teach him love and peace... I know all too well that we do not live in a colorblind, post-racial society and to pretend like we do would be a great injustice and disservice to him:( I still have a couple of years to reflect on this but thats where I stand right now. Any thoughts/opinions on that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Josie!

      Thank you very much for your comment! It made me think... a lot. I never really talk about what people said about me and M when we went downtown, or to a fest... We hear a lot of mean words as soon as we step out of the house. Maybe living in Germany makes it worse as well? I don't know.

      My Godson is mixed, too. His dad left before he was born, so now it's the mom's responsibility to raise him - but it's tough. She is white, the little one looks just like his dad. But what can you tell a little boy when the other kids at kindergarten say mean stuff about him being mixed; darker than the average german kid? As his Godmother I try to teach him a lot about his heritage as well. His dad is from Little Rock/AR as well, so I brought him tons of stuff. Now he can explore the other parts of his roots as well!

      I was just browsing through your blog, looking at pictures of your wonderful little family - and you know what? I think as long as there are people like us, showing the rest of the world that THIS IS THE WAY TO LIVE AND TO LOVE, there is a chance that our world will be a better place to live for our kids and grandchildren.
      I understand your concerns... But just try to raise your son telling him he is an awesome person who unites the best of both worlds :)

      xoxo
      Anni

      Delete

Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a comment. I love reading them all and will try my best to answer all of your questions. If you would like to contact me for a quicker response please feel free to tweet me at (@grfrprincess), message me on Instagram (@anni_s) or email me. ~Anni

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Vacation Recap Part II / The Little Rock Nine




"The courts can't change how white people think about blacks,
t
hey have to change themselves." - Daisy Bates



This was definitely the most interesting and emotional story I've heard about for the first time during my tripo to Arkansas:

The Little Rock Nine


"The Little Rock Nine were a group of African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in 1957. The ensuing Little Rock Crisis, in which the students were initially prevented from entering the racially segregated school by Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus, and then attended after the intervention of President Eisenhower.
The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, 347 U.S. 483, on May 17, 1954. The decision declared all laws establishing segregated schools to be unconstitutional, and it called for the desegregation of all schools throughout the nation.
 
After the decision, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) attempted to register black students in previously all-white schools in cities throughout the South. In Little Rock, the capital city of Arkansas, the Little Rock School Board agreed to comply with the high court's ruling. Virgil Blossom, the Superintendent of Schools, submitted a plan of gradual integration to the school board on May 24, 1955, which the board unanimously approved.
 
The plan would be implemented during the fall of the 1957 school year, which would begin in September 1957. By 1957, the NAACP had registered nine black students to attend the previously all-white Little Rock Central High, selected on the criteria of excellent grades and attendance.
 
The nicknamed "Little Rock Nine" consisted of:
  • Ernest Green (b. 1941)
  • Elizabeth Eckford (b. 1941)
  • Jefferson Thomas (1942–2010)
  • Terrence Roberts (b. 1941)
  • Carlotta Walls LaNier (b. 1942)
  • Minnijean Brown (b. 1941)
  • Gloria Ray Karlmark (b. 1942)
  • Thelma Mothershed (b. 1940)
  • Melba Pattillo Beals (b. 1941)
 
Ernest Green was the first African American to graduate from Central High School."
(via Wikipedia)

____________________________
 
Now, in 2013, there are still too many people out there, who think this is wrong:
 
 
I love my man. I love our clash of cultures. And I'm looking forward to teach our kids one day, that the only thing that matters, is the heart and soul. Not the way people look on the outside.
And not the color of their skin.

profile

 
Shop Rachael Ray Store

5 comments :

  1. I haven't been there, but it does sound interesting. I'm glad you enjoyed your trip!

    ReplyDelete
  2. wow...thanks for sharing the "Little Rock 9". I must admit to you, that I too had some feelings about interracial marriage/dating...that's just how I grew up, but when my sister "came out" it taught me that love is love...I want everyone to experience love like I do, and everyone deserves it! God bless your relationship and block them haters!

    Great post Anne!
    -Rekita

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Rekita Nicole,
      Thank you so much for you honest comment! :)
      Nice said "Love is love"! More people should live and love that way!
      The "Little Rock 9" story really touched me. I didn't hear anything about them before. I'm happy I got a chance to learn about those courageous young people!
      xoxo
      Anni

      Delete
  3. Thanks for posting this! I'm a bit torn...as a mother of a biracial son I'm not sure what to teach him. Of course the most important thing that matters is the heart and soul but the outside counts too (perhaps not for love purposes but definitely for life purposes).

    Society will always view my son as a black/bi-racial boy/man. He will be judged against a completely different standard than his white counterparts -- it's just the way it goes. So as much as I want to teach him love and peace... I know all too well that we do not live in a colorblind, post-racial society and to pretend like we do would be a great injustice and disservice to him:( I still have a couple of years to reflect on this but thats where I stand right now. Any thoughts/opinions on that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Josie!

      Thank you very much for your comment! It made me think... a lot. I never really talk about what people said about me and M when we went downtown, or to a fest... We hear a lot of mean words as soon as we step out of the house. Maybe living in Germany makes it worse as well? I don't know.

      My Godson is mixed, too. His dad left before he was born, so now it's the mom's responsibility to raise him - but it's tough. She is white, the little one looks just like his dad. But what can you tell a little boy when the other kids at kindergarten say mean stuff about him being mixed; darker than the average german kid? As his Godmother I try to teach him a lot about his heritage as well. His dad is from Little Rock/AR as well, so I brought him tons of stuff. Now he can explore the other parts of his roots as well!

      I was just browsing through your blog, looking at pictures of your wonderful little family - and you know what? I think as long as there are people like us, showing the rest of the world that THIS IS THE WAY TO LIVE AND TO LOVE, there is a chance that our world will be a better place to live for our kids and grandchildren.
      I understand your concerns... But just try to raise your son telling him he is an awesome person who unites the best of both worlds :)

      xoxo
      Anni

      Delete

Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a comment. I love reading them all and will try my best to answer all of your questions. If you would like to contact me for a quicker response please feel free to tweet me at (@grfrprincess), message me on Instagram (@anni_s) or email me. ~Anni